The James Memorial Art Center

The James Memorial Art Center

621 1st Ave W. P.O. Box 1714 Williston, ND 58802-1714

Phone: 701-774-3601

Email: jmps@nemont.net

Hours:
Monday - Thursday -- 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Friday & Sunday -- 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Saturday -- CLOSED

For more event information:

Click the Event tab on the left of the screen

Announcements:

An up-to-date calendar is listed at the top of the “Facilities” page.  If you need to check available dates, click the link and view the PDF.  

The JMPS Annual Meeting will be held Sunday April 12 at 1:00pm at the James.

Free admission to the 2nd Sunday event “An Afternoon of Piano” to members who attend the meeting.

The James Memorial Preservation Society Bylaws are available for review and approval at this Annual Meeting. Members, Please read through them if you plan on attending the meeting so that they may be approved.

Updated bylaws-to approve

Current Exhibit

“Based Couture”

by

Shane Brinster

 

Heady Stuff I

 

 

Artist Bio

Shane Brinster is a multi-media artist from North Dakota. In the past he has lived in Albuquerque, Austin and San Francisco, and has resided in Sawyer, North Dakota since 1999. Shane attended the University of New Mexico, where he studied video editing and sculpture. His paintings have been shown at the Taube Museum of Art in Minot. His current work consists of spray paint on canvas, applied via a combination of freehand and stencils.

 

Artist Statement

My work is postmodern; incorporating aspects of pop art, graffiti art and abstract expressionism. The primary inspirations for my current work are media which appropriate existing forms; recontextualizing them and synthesizing entirely new creations. My work seeks to explore interrelationships between ideas of intellectual property, collective ownership, fair use and the

politics of graffiti. My current series juxtaposes 20th century cultural archetypes with a contemporary, gritty and urban style both in content and execution. I utilize a graffiti stencil technique while applying the aesthetics of a more traditional silkscreen approach. I approach the individual layers of each stencil with the idea that each could be a finished work. The addition of each layer involves a lack of control, which makes each piece unique and opens the door for unexpected results. Just as each work builds upon itself, each piece suggests the next as I learn what works, both in the sense of style and technique